David Opderbeck on David Bentley Hart’s Tradition and Apocalypse

Author note: We are grateful to Dr. Opderbeck for this review. He is Professor of Law at Seton Hall University Law School and also teaches in Seton Hall’s Department of Religion. In addition to his law degrees, he holds an MAT from Fuller Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. in Systematic and Philosophical Theology from the … Continue reading David Opderbeck on David Bentley Hart’s Tradition and Apocalypse

Philip Bakardzhiev, “a Fellow Orthodox Christian,” Finds “the Author” Not Orthodox

Philip Bakardzhiev has posted an online review of David Bentley Hart's You Are Gods and does so from "the perspective of a fellow Orthodox Christian who wishes to appraise Hart’s legitimacy in presenting his views as Orthodox." This review was a little disorienting, and not primarily because of it's extraordinary number of typos. (There is … Continue reading Philip Bakardzhiev, “a Fellow Orthodox Christian,” Finds “the Author” Not Orthodox

Reading Proto-Genesis and Paul with David Bentley Hart (and Moses)

[Note: I’m honored to have had this article shared here by David Bentley Hart (along with one other on this topic).] As far as I can tell, the most "infamous" passage in Tradition and Apocalypse (controversial and disappointing even with some of Hart’s most informed and appreciative readers1) has been Hart's summary of the original … Continue reading Reading Proto-Genesis and Paul with David Bentley Hart (and Moses)

A Brief (and Christian) Account of All Reality

Prefatory Note: These are reflections of my own as I continue to process this delightful opportunity that I had to interview Jordan Daniel Wood. I’ll be ruminating for a long time to come over many things that Jordan shared, and I very much look forward to reading his book on Maximus Confessor that releases this … Continue reading A Brief (and Christian) Account of All Reality

The Hagia Sophia and Secularism’s Unquestioned Authority

I'm honored to have an essay shared in Issue 6 of Jacob’s Well, the magazine of the Diocese of New York and New Jersey (OCA) published with the blessing of His Eminence Archbishop Michael. This issue is focused on the topic of secularism, and my piece is entitled "The Hagia Sophia and Secularism’s Unquestioned Authority: … Continue reading The Hagia Sophia and Secularism’s Unquestioned Authority

God’s Goodness and How We Read the Scriptures

Note on provenance: The main content of this post was compiled from Twitter by Aaron Jordan. He shared it in an online group and gave permission for his work to be re-shared here as well. Aaron is a full-time music educator, a part-time choral conductor, a some-time film composer, and a voracious reader, especially of … Continue reading God’s Goodness and How We Read the Scriptures

Why Everyone (and Especially Christians) Should Believe in Fairies

[Note: this has been a widely shared post as I've noted here, and I've added a little more in part four of a series where I reposted this content on ClassicalU.com.] As I keep reading and growing older, it seems increasingly obvious to me that we modern people become more and more blind and distracted … Continue reading Why Everyone (and Especially Christians) Should Believe in Fairies

“God Is Not ‘The Other’ of Anything”: So Why Does Feser Insist Otherwise?

I was going to begin this post with an apology for procrastinating as long as I have in writing it, but, frankly, I’m not sorry, at least not this time. Allow me to explain. On March 31st, Ed Feser published a review of David Bentley Hart’s newest collection of essays—You Are Gods—in Public Discourse. The … Continue reading “God Is Not ‘The Other’ of Anything”: So Why Does Feser Insist Otherwise?

David Bentley Hart’s Call to Inhabit Our Living Traditions

“‘Tradition’ …is the conviction that one has truly heard a call from the realm of the transcendent, but a call that must be heard again before its meaning can be grasped or its summons obeyed; and the labor of interpretation is the diligent practice of waiting attentively in the interval, for fear otherwise of forgetting … Continue reading David Bentley Hart’s Call to Inhabit Our Living Traditions